Three Interesting Projects Making Use of E-Waste

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Photo: Empowermagazine.com

Photo: Empowermagazine.com

Across the globe, electronic waste is quickly becoming the largest category of waste. The world’s biggest consumer of electronics is the United States, yet with all this consumption, only 20 to 25 percent of computers, televisions and devices are recycled. Here are three projects making use of our old gadgets.

Elle

Photo: Elle.godoymarcela.com

Photo: Elle.godoymarcela.com

Marcela Godoy noticed how televisions and other electronics were put out with the garbage on the street every day. Regularly discarded for better, faster or newer electronics—these still useful items are crowding landfills. This graduate student of technology and design started exploring new uses for these items. She created a collection of necklaces, Elle and is working on another line that keeps the functionality of still-working electronics while improving aesthetics.

Follow Marcela’s steps to make your own necklace or buy one of hers.

Theo Kamecke

Photo: Theokamecke.com

Photo: Theokamecke.com

Former film maker Theo Kamecke left his spot from behind the camera to create sculptures with circuit boards. Inspired by the graphic patterns of these electronics, he created a series of artworks from actual electronic circuitry treated to give the appearance of metal over polished black stone. Some of his work includes cabinets, benches and armoires, among others for sale.

To purchase any of Theo’s one-of-a-kind creations or to see his art in museums, visit his website TheoKamecke.com.

N+EW (No More Electronic Waste)

Photo: Ralonso.com

Photo: Ralonso.com

Rodrigo Alonso Schramm is a graphic designer with a penchant for recycling. This designer founded the industrial arm of Porta4 design studio and focuses on coming up for new uses for waste materials. He’s created furniture and lighting made with recycled plastic and metal waste from electronic devices. His most recent collection, 100%, is compressed plastic that has been roto-molded to create a completely different project that can then be molded again and again—making it useful forever.

To see more of Rodrigo’s work, check out his portfolio and catch up with the progress of Porta4‘s latest projects.

Do Your Part

If your electronics are still in good working shape, pass them on. Look around in your local community for organizations that connect people in need with secondhand electronics. If your electronics are no longer useable, then recycle them. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is a great resource on how and where to best dispose of your electronics.

 

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