Seen and Heard — The Earth Day Everyday Edition

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Seen and Heard — The Earth Day Everyday Edition

Photo: Unsplash.com/louis_moncouyoux

We love how enthusiastic communities everywhere get about Earth Day, after all we should be celebrating this wonderful planet we call home. But the truth is that as society gets more educated about living sustainably and consuming mindfully, we’re spending every day doing more to keep Earth beautiful. That’s 365 days of Earth Day! The Krrb team is joining in by highlighting new products, trends and ideas that make eco-friendly living the norm.

Furniture with a Small Carbon Footprint

Seen and Heard — The Earth Day Everyday Edition

Photo: Thecoolector.com

Being a part of the Krrb community, buying pre-owned is the way to go when it comes to furniture and home decor. It’s better for the planet and easier on your wallet. But if you need to buy new, look for items that are handmade, locally-sourced and sustainable. That’s exactly what Platonics Wiref furniture series plans to do. Completely hand-crafted with natural bio-degradable materials from local artisans in Greece, their furniture pieces have a very small carbon footprint. However make no mistake, the Platonics Wiref furniture series are high-quality pieces that are created to last a long time. Their modular design, consisting of a bookcase, a drawer and a doormate, can be re-worked as your needs change. Plus they ship flat-packed which means less packaging waste and shipping costs. This Earth Day, support this new experimental brand that is unifying environmental protections with industrial design. —Mateo

The Zero Waste Lifestyle Trend

Seen and Heard — The Earth Day Everyday Edition

Photo: Zerowastechef.com

Having interviewed Bea Johnson on heirloom guilt, I got a peek at her zero waste lifestyle that includes composting hair and nail clipping and refilling wine bottles at a local winery. This mission to reduce personal consumption and waste is growing among younger demographics who can made everyday changes without drastically changing their lives. Recently News.com in Australia featured a number of bloggers who have managed to minimize their lifestyle while not moving off the grid. I’m excited by the increase of individuals vocalizing how they’re accomplishing a zero waste lifestyle in realistic environments. From chefs to families to young professionals, it’s inspiring to see a more attainable way of achieving the zero waste lifestyle. —Vee

The Edible Alternative to Plastic Utensils

Seen and Heard — The Earth Day Everyday Edition

Photo: Facebook.com/Eat-Your-SpoonBakeys

It’s no secret: I’m an eater. And as an avid fan of take-out, I’ve probably amassed a small heap of plastic cutlery that have ultimately ended up in the trash. That’s why I love this initiative: edible utensils made from sorghum flour. They’re vegan, organic, kosher, don’t degrade in liquids (perfect for hot soups and ice cream), and biodegrade if you don’t feel like eating them. The inventors can make “100 sorghum based spoons with the energy it takes to produce 1 plastic utensil,” which will make a huge impact on the environment. The Kickstarter campaign has already made 11x it’s original goal, and could be a tasty solution to global waste. —Lauren

The Uroboro Composting System by Marco Balsinha

We get it, you don’t want a big eyesore in your otherwise perfectly curated space, but you’re in luck because there are now some chic ways to get in the composting game! The Portuguese designer, Marco Balsinha, crafted the “Uroboro” which is a composting system modeled after the shape of a tree. The structure is made up of four interlocking terracotta bins, plants, earthworms which act as a mini eco-system to help with the process of compositing. The based is then topped with a plant which gets lower and lowers as the process of composting is occurring. In the end the Uroboro looks like a trendy plant stand, but in reality it is so much more! I’m probably not the best person to explain the scientific process (no disrespect to my 8th grade Earth science teacher), so you should definitely head over to Treehugger and read all about how the project completely functions. —Chrissy

How are you celebrating Earth Day on April 22nd?

 
  • Pat S

    I couldn’t believe you could use them for soup or cereal. I wanted to buy the spoon molds and remember thinking it would be cool to make them from chocolate and eat your dessert. I thought they will melt in your hand. It would be awesome to see fast food using these or offering the option but I don’t know how cost effective they will be. Be sure to let us know if you try them.

  • Lauren Hannel

    The real kicker for me was seeing that they can also be used with hot foods, making the options pretty much endless. And I agree about the flavors! Very excited to see how this keeps developing

  • Pat S

    Vee, I love the bakery spoons. What a great idea. When I used plastic to entertain I kept a container for them so I could wash and reuse. I hope they come out with a mixed pack of flavors. I have seen molds for spoons for chocolate and candies.

  • What’s unique about the Uroboro composting system is that this is really the first double-use composting option that works indoors and does not look like a traditional compost bin (i.e. ugly).

    So for people who live in apartment buildings or in cold climates, you are still able to compost but within the guise of a small planter. Very cool!