Live Collaboratively — City Residents are Choosing Community Living

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Live Collaboratively — City Residents are Choosing Community Living

Photo: Tokesignals.com

There are so many ways to live collaboratively without making drastic changes to your lifestyle. We even list 25 here that won’t have you packing up and moving to a commune. But that’s also an option because community living is back and in a whole new way. If you’re thinking 1970’s-era hippies living in the middle of nowhere, this is not. Read on to see why young professionals in cities are gravitating toward this collaborative housing and more.

A photo posted by Common (@hi.common) on

With three homes in Brooklyn—one in Williamsburg, two in Crown Heights—Common offers community-driven housing that comes fully furnished. Their website states the values for living together peacefully; connecting, helping out, and evolving among them. Perhaps this is the big draw to Common, or maybe it’s the fact that they handle tedious tasks of everyday adult life including cleaning, handyman tasks, utility bills and even shopping for toilet paper. Resident testimonials say its a little bit of both. Since they’re not dealing with day to day responsibilities, they spend their down time together having impromptu dinners, networking and just chatting because the environment makes it easy.

Live Collaboratively — City Residents are Choosing Community Living

Photo: 20mission.com

Common isn’t the first of it’s kind, maybe just the first to balance community and housing successfully. To fill need for apartments by San Francisco’s tech industry, 20Mission came on the scene in 2012 with 41 units for art and tech creators. With a similar set up of individual rooms and shared spaces like a kitchen, rooftop garden and deck, 20Mission closed its doors in fall 2014. Similarly Campus with multiple leased homes in the Bay Area create an environment where residents could bounce from location to location and even stay at a vacation home in Lake Tahoe or Napa. Unfortunately Campus folded last year.

A photo posted by WeLive (@welive) on

New to the community living arena is WeLive, from co-working company WeWork. Their first residential space located on Manhattan’s Wall street will house over 450 people, sharing a yoga studio, screening rooms and a laundry room. WeLive has an app for residents, keeping them connected and engaging with each other for work and play. Another residence is available in Washington DC’s Crystal City, with 216 units.

It was only a matter of time before the sharing economy permeated everyday living. If these new collaborative living businesses have figured out the way to provide community as a viable amenity, it comes at a high cost. Would you consider living in an urban community living residence? Let me know in the comments.