Krrbside Roadshow — Vintage Ashtrays and Dish Set

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Gotta love those happy reactions on Antique Roadshow. Photo: Ohmygoff.tv

Gotta love those happy reactions on Antique Roadshow. Photo: Ohmygoff.tv

One of the greatest joys of shopping garage sales is landing an undiscovered valuable find. Since it’s garage sale month on Krrb, there are plenty of opportunities to go mining for heirlooms. But we can’t think about profitable revelations without thinking about Antique Roadshow. The PBS show is known for its appraisal surprises — when owners found their collections to be worth far more than they imagined. Following the fun nature of Antique Roadshow, we asked Krrb member Mer of Swirling Orange, an experienced seller of vintage home and kitchen decor to appraise a couple Krrb finds. Read on to learn more about these secondhand finds and their value.

1960s Amber Glass Ashtray

Photo: Krrb.com/gentrifiedjunk?auto=format

Photo: Krrb.com/gentrifiedjunk?auto=format

The ashtrays look to be more late 1950s than 1960s and were probably inserts in cast iron standing ashtrays. The cast iron part was a pedestal with an arch to carry or move it and the ashtray was inserted into a depression at the top of the cast iron. Most valuable these days is the ashtray pedestal. There was no “standard” maker of these ashtrays so it’s hard to tell who made the glass inserts.

If I were selling the glass ashtray insert, I would market it or sell it as a trinket dish, bureau dish, change bowl, other uses than an ashtray. If I had the cast iron stand, I would think that with the glass inserts (these), it would worth at minimum of $100 and a maximum of $145.

Vintage Urban Rooster & Weathervane Set of Dishes

Photo: Krrb.com/HippieHog?auto=format

Photo: Krrb.com/HippieHog?auto=format

The Weathervane dishes are from the 1950s. They appear to be Franciscan or Taylor, Smith and Taylor but I can’t tell for sure without feeling them. Made from a standard ceramic that was manufactured in the USA at the time, there are several manufacturers it could be, the two I named as well as Bauer pottery and California Pottery. The rooster pattern makes me think it’s Taylor, Smith, Taylor or Franciscan. Each of those companies were known for their folksy or cottage-y patterns.

For a complete set, these dishes without chips are worth about $150 to $200. The colors and graphic design are very iconic of the time period.

 

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