Inside Hansen Mansion, an 1886 Victorian Home in Chicago

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Inside Hansen Mansion, an 1886 Victorian Home in Chicago

Looking for an ideal Bed and Breakfast spot in Chicago, Fran Ramer fell in love with 164 West Eugene Street. Known as the Hansen House Mansion after reknown Norwegian artist and architect Harald Marius Hansen, the home has signature details including stained glass, copper-lined toilets and intricate woodwork on the stairs. Even the brass hinges on the doors are etched.

Inside Hansen Mansion, an 1886 Victorian Home in Chicago

The living room appears today exactly as it did in 1886. The ornate pair of carved chairs were recently sold on Krrb.

Hansen moved to Chicago after the Great Chicago Fire of 1891 to help re-create the major metropolis. Born in 1849, by the mid-1800s Hansen was already known for his designs. He designed many single family and row homes in the Lincoln Park area, and in 1886 designed twelve Queen Annes homes one block from the park, the lake and the zoo. He chose to live in and raise his family in the one now referred to as The Hansen House Mansion.

Hansen died at his home in 1921, but his youngest daughter Carrie lived in the house until the 1960s. The modernization movement eliminated seven of the Hansen homes in Lincoln Park. The surviving five are designated as Historically Significant by the Preservation Society as examples of the now rare Second Empire architectural style.

Inside Hansen Mansion, an 1886 Victorian Home in Chicago

Only the fourth owner of this historical mansion in 128 years, Fran is now making this home her own. For sale on her Krrb corner, you’ll find furnishings and artwork from the 1800s including a rare Louis Majorelle bed and armoire.

Inside Hansen Mansion, an 1886 Victorian Home in Chicago

The Hansen Mansion retains most of its original Victorian details such as Giannini and Hilgart stained glass windows, original gas and electric light fixtures, coal-burning fireplaces and inlaid floors. While Fran ran the house as a B&B, the home was furnished with pieces of the time period—pieces that she is now selling. When Krrb members purchase any of the antiques on Hansen’s Krrb corner, photos of the home as well as a description of the history of the item will be included in the purchase, giving context and a story to very special antiques.

 

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