20 Things That Will Catch Your Eye at the DMA

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20 Things That Will Catch Your Eye at the DMA

This past weekend, I was lucky enough to visit the Dallas Museum of Art. If you have ever visited the DMA, you know what a treat it is! As one of the largest museums in the country, they offer free general admission to their large and diverse collection of art. From Van Gogh to Picasso and Magritte to Gehry, the artists showcased at the Dallas Museum of Art represent the most brilliant creative minds in furniture design, paintings, engravings and sculpture. Check out 20 of my favorite art pieces currently on view at the DMA!

Where are you, Edison…? (Wo bist du, Edison)

Ingo Maurer, German, 1997

Where are you, Edison…? is an acrylic glass and aluminum lampshade suspended from the ceiling with a hologram lightbulb lit from within. The process to create this lamp involves a complicated chemical developing process and a laser resulting in each lamp being one-of-a-kind.

Sheaves Of Wheat

Vincent Van Gogh, Holland, 1890
20 Things That Will Catch Your Eye at the DMA

The Sheaves Of Wheat was one of the last large canvases painted by Vincent Van Gogh shortly before the artist committed suicide. This piece was one of thirteen gifted by Van Gogh’s brother, Théo, and all but one of the completed works were painted in the horizontal landscape.

Harrowing Of Hell, from The Engraved Passion

Albrecht Dürer, German, 1512
20 Things That Will Catch Your Eye at the DMA

Harrowing Of Hell was created by the master woodcut printmaker of the Renaissance period, Albrecht Dürer. Having revolutionized the medium of printmaking, his epitaph reads “Whatever was mortal in Albrecht Dürer lies beneath this mound.”

You Can’t Lay Down Your Memory

Tejo Remy, Dutch, 1991
20 Things That Will Catch Your Eye at the DMA

You Can’t Lay Down Your Memory is made of found drawers held together by a jute strap and is said to be the artist’s exploration on the memory system. A popular method to train your memory is to imagine facts as parts of a house, and in this case, the chaotic stack of drawers illustrates the complexity of our memories.

Windmill

Piet Mondrian, Dutch, 1917
20 Things That Will Catch Your Eye at the DMA

The Windmill is not all as well known as Piet Mondrian’s later work (Composition with Blue, Red and Yellow), but his earlier pieces show his transition into abstract art. Mondrian is considered to be one of the great modernist painters of the 20th century.

Marshmallow Sofa

George Nelson/Herman Miller/Irving Harper, American, 1954-1955
20 Things That Will Catch Your Eye at the DMA

The Marshmallow sofa first appeared in a 1956 Herman Miller catalogue, but despite its interesting appearance, it proved too modern for widespread success. Even though the initial run was removed from production in 1965, the Marshmallow sofa was given another shot in 1988 to an eager new generation.

Oedipus At Colonus

Jean Antoine Théodore Giroust, French, 1788
20 Things That Will Catch Your Eye at the DMA

Oedipus At Colonus is a painting by Neoclassical artist, Jean Antoine Théodore Giroust. Having been taught by Joseph-Marie Vien, Giroust actually studied with the notable, Jacques-Louis David.

Polo Horse Tomb Figure

Unknown, Chinese, Tang Dynasty (A.D. 618-907)
20 Things That Will Catch Your Eye at the DMA

This polo horse tomb figure is a ceramic sculpture that has been dated back to the Tang Dynasty.

Cone Chair

Verner Panton, Danish, 1958
20 Things That Will Catch Your Eye at the DMA

The Cone Chair was originally designed for a Danish restaurant, but gained popularity through its striking appearance. Verner Panton ushered in a futuristic design by inverting the cone on its tip and attaching a sleek metal foot.

Water Lilies

Claude Monet, French, 1908
20 Things That Will Catch Your Eye at the DMA

The Water Lilies painting hanging at the DMA is one of many. Based on his actual Garden in Giverny, Monet wanted to share the illusion of “endless whole, of water without horizon or bank.”

Chair

Donald Judd/Janssen C.V., American/Holland, 1984-1998
20 Things That Will Catch Your Eye at the DMA

Simply titled the Chair, this functional rectangular structure is made of copper. While designed in 1984, the actual chair was not created until 1998.

The Guitarist

Pablo Picasso, Spanish, 1965
20 Things That Will Catch Your Eye at the DMA

The Guitarist, not to be confused with the Old Guitarist in 1903, is thought to be Pablo Picasso’s self-portrait of then aging artist. Picasso’s friend Hélène Parmelin said that Picasso felt as if “We would look at the canvases straight in the eyes. We played at giving our opinions of the man in front of us.”

Veryround Chair

Louise Campbell/Zanotta, Danish & British/Italian, 2006
20 Things That Will Catch Your Eye at the DMA

The Veryround chair is a low-to-the-floor steel structure with a white enamel coating cut with a three-dimensional laser. Each chair has 160 circles overlapping to create the overall circular shape.

Santa Gertrudis (Saint Gertrude)

Miguel Cabrera, Mexican, 1763
20 Things That Will Catch Your Eye at the DMA

This depiction of Santa Gertrudis was painted by the popular 18th century Mexican artist, Miguel Cabrera. Over 309 pieces of art were said to have been produced at his large studio.

Ritual Urn with Two Handles

Unknown, China: Neolithic Age, Yangshao Culture, Machang Phase (3000-2000 B.C.)
20 Things That Will Catch Your Eye at the DMA

This urn is an unglazed pottery piece with iron oxide design painted on the sides. This ritual piece has been traced back to China in the Neolithic age.

Buildings

Charles Demuth, American, 1930-1931
20 Things That Will Catch Your Eye at the DMA

One of the last major series of paintings, Buildings was inspired by Pennsylvania architecture that Charles Demuth created before his death in 1935. Demuth’s most well known work is My Egypt, a precisionist depiction of a grain elevator.

Armchair

Alexander Girard/Herman Miller, American, 1967
20 Things That Will Catch Your Eye at the DMA

The Armchair was designed by Alexander Girard, who was actually trained as an architect. However proficient in all types of design, Girard believed quality should speak for itself and this dedication rings true in all his designs.

Our Daily Bread (Le Pain Quotidien)

René Magritte, Belgian, 1942
20 Things That Will Catch Your Eye at the DMA

Our Daily Bread was painted by Belgian surrealist artist René Magritte shortly before he entered his “Renoir period” into 1943. Despite his work, Magritte did not achieve international acclaim until his 50’s.

Bougival

Maurice Vlaminck, France, 1905-1906
20 Things That Will Catch Your Eye at the DMA

Bougival was painted by French painter Maurice Vlaminck during his “Fauve period” and was said to be inspired by Vincent Van Gogh’s use of color and Paul Cézanne’s structured landscapes. This particular piece is considered to be Vlaminck finest composition.

Easy Edges Chair

Frank O. Gehry, American, 1971
20 Things That Will Catch Your Eye at the DMA

The Easy Edges chair, designed by Frank O. Gehry, revolutionized the cardboard furniture on the 1960’s. The Easy Edges collection featured a newly created material of corrugated cardboard glued in alternating directions, Edge board, that Gehry created in his office.

Have you been to the Dallas Museum of Art? Let us know in the comments!